22 veterans commit suicide each day

1,892 US Veterans have committed suicide since January 1, 2014:

 

22 veterans kill them self's each day

22 veterans kill them self’s each day

On average, 22 veterans commit suicide each day, according to the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA).
To commemorate them and raise awareness, 32 veterans from the group flew to Washington, D.C., to plant 1,892 flags on the National Mall today, one for each of the veterans that the group says took his or her own life in 2014. IAVA extrapolated that number from a 2012 Veterans Administration reportfinding that 22 veterans took their lives each day in 2009 and 2010, only a slight increase from years past, and a number that includes all veterans, not just those who served in America’s more recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The event was part of IAVA’s 2014 Storm the Hill campaign, an annual week of action in which organization vets meet with lawmakers to push a veterans’ agenda picked for that year. In 2013, it was the Veterans Affairs benefits-claim backlog; this year, it’s veteran suicides.
“I know several individuals that have died by suicide,” Sara Poquette of Dallas, a video journalist who served in Iraq, said, adding that she herself considered suicide while experiencing the hardships of reintegrating into civilian life. “For me personally, it was more just getting through until I was really ready to get help, just realizing that my life was going down a path that I never really wanted it to go down.”
In Joining IAVA, Poquette said, she found a “new unit.”
The Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America is pushing a bill, the Suicide Prevention for America’s Veterans Act, which Sen. John Walsh, D-Mont., plans to introduce. Walsh commanded a Montana National Guard battalion in Iraq.
“When we returned home, one of my young sergeants died by suicide, so this is very personal to me,” Walsh told reporters on the Mall today, calling veteran suicides “an epidemic we cannot allow to continue.”
The bill would extend eligibility for Veterans Administration health care, create a pilot program for student-loan repayment if health care professionals work for the VA, instigate a review of certain behavioral discharges, and mandate a review of mental health care programs at the VA, IAVA said.
The group is calling on Congress to pass the bill by Memorial Day.
Source:  Newsforage.com

Monsanto’s kills 1,500 Indian Farmers

Over 1,500 farmers in the Indian state of Chattisgarh committed suicide. The motive has been blamed on farmers being crippled by overwhelming debt in the face of crop failure:

over 1,500 farmers in the Indian state of Chattisgarh committed suicide. The motive has been blamed on farmers being crippled by overwhelming debt in the face of crop failure.

over 1,500 farmers in the Indian state of Chattisgarh committed suicide. The motive has been blamed on farmers being crippled by overwhelming debt in the face of crop failure.

While many may have been shocked by these deaths, farmer suicides in India, and increasingly across the world, are not new. Crop failure may have pushed farmers over the edge, but American companies have been leading them to the cliff for years. Bharatendu Prakash, from the Organic Farming Association of India, told the Press Association:

Farmers’ suicides are increasing due to a vicious circle created by money lenders. They lure farmers to take money but when the crops fail, they are left with no option other than death.

The article also quotes the UK’s Daily Mail, enlightening us further:

…The death of this respected farmer (Shankara Mandaukar) has been blamed on something far more modern and sinister: genetically modified crops. Shankara, like millions of other Indian farmers, had been promised previously unheard of harvests and income if he switched from farming with traditional seeds to planting GM seeds instead.

Oh yes, the promise of feeding the poor of every country via genetically-modified (GM) seeds. This approach to dealing with worldwide hunger and poverty is touted by the United Nations, NAFTA, and the US government. And as the Daily Mail article later notes, “pro-GM experts claim that it is rural poverty, alcoholism, drought and ‘agrarian distress’ that is the real reason for the horrific toll.” While poverty and drought have likely contributed somewhat to poor harvests, leading the farmers to stress about their family and land, the mass suicides might have more to do with the bank loans sometimes totaling $3,000 US that these farmers have to take out in order to buy Monsanto’s (the leader in GM) seeds. The way Monsanto approaches these farmers reminds me of 19th century snake oil salesman:

The salesmen tell farmers of the amazing yields other Vidarbha growers have enjoyed while using their products, plastering villages with posters detailing “True Stories of Farmers Who Have Sown Bt Cotton.” Old-fashioned cotton seeds pale in comparison to Monsanto’s patented wonder seeds, say the salesmen, as much as an average old steer is humbled by a fine Jersey cow.

Farmers have traditionally used seeds year after year and rotated their crops in order to get the most benefit from the land. Monsanto’s seeds, on the other hand, have to be paid for every year in order to “re-license” the seeds, sinking them deeper into debt. And oh, yeah, most of these seeds are “Terminator” seeds, which means they don’t actually produce viable seeds of their own.  Farmers throughout the world are dealing with these issues.

Website Prevent Suicide Among Youth

 

Innovative Website to Prevent Suicide Risk Among Youth Launched:

Innovative Website to Prevent Suicide Risk Among Youth Launched

Innovative Website to Prevent Suicide Risk Among Youth Launched

In a bid to promote suicide prevention among youths an innovative peer-to-peer website has been launched which may encourage youth and young adults to communicate creatively about the difficult times they are experiencing so their messages can help peers encountering similar problems. The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey’s Traumatic Loss Coalitions for Youth & Young Adults Program (TLC) and the New Jersey Division of Child Behavioral Services have developed the website, Jersey Voice (www.jerseyvoice.net) which was officially launched this week — National Suicide Prevention Week (September 9-15). The TLC, with the support of the New Jersey Department of Children and Families, developed this forum, which “exists for all – teens and young adults – in New Jersey who have ever had a horrible day, struggled with mental health, or lost a loved one. It’s about adults and experts stepping back (for the most part) and letting us do what we need to do and say what we need to say. It’s about using our own unique Jersey voices to help each other out, recognize our strengths, and inspire hope. It’s about getting involved, making a difference, and keeping Jersey strong.” TLC Director Donna Amundson pointed out that Jersey Voice’s mission is to help strengthen and advance TLC’s upstream suicide prevention efforts, to try to reach youth before they begin to feel hopeless and helpless. “We have created a platform where individuals can share their stories of hope, help and strength and getting through the difficult times in life with messages that can be told through stories, poems, music, photography, posters, videos and other creative outlets. The intent is that these stories will remain front and center on the website as a source of support and inspiration for other New Jersey teens and young adults,” Amundson explained. Allison Blake, Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Children and Families, said, “The mission of this website is to provide a space where the resounding voices of peers echo throughout as they show each other how to tap into strength, resiliency and connection when facing difficult times at home, at school or at play. We want to help our youth population find solutions to whatever types of stressful behavioral problems they encounter before they become crises.” TLC partnered with Emotion Technology to develop this site that combines a focus on suicide prevention, intervention and postvention with social media outlets to reach youth and young adults where they live and communicate. The site includes a series of tools and contacts, including a confidential and anonymous helpline for New Jersey’s youth and young adults. The site will also add a blog. As part of its launch, jerseyvoice.net is sponsoring the first Jersey Voice Statewide Social Media Festival to invite submissions in the form of prose, poems, music, song and dance, public service announcements, video and photography. The Traumatic Loss Coalitions for Youth Program. The Traumatic Loss Coalitions for Youth Program (TLC) at UMDNJ-University Behavioral HealthCare is New Jersey’s primary youth suicide prevention program funded by the Department of Children & Families, Division of Children’s System of Care. The TLC is an interactive, statewide network that offers collaboration and support to professionals working with school-age youth. The dual mission of the TLC is excellence in suicide prevention and trauma response assistance to schools following unfortunate losses due to suicide, homicide, accident and illness. This is accomplished through county, regional and statewide conferences, training, consultation, onsite traumatic loss response, and technical assistance. The purpose is to ensure that those working with youth from a variety of disciplines and programs have up-to-date knowledge about mental health issues, suicide prevention, traumatic grief, and resiliency enhancement. Since its inception, the TLC has trained thousands of individuals throughout the state with the purpose of saving lives and promoting post trauma healing and resiliency for the youth of New Jersey.