Plants recognize their siblings

Plants recognize their siblings, biologists discover:

 

 

Plants recognize their siblings, biologists discover

Plants recognize their siblings, biologists discover

The next time you venture into your garden armed with plants, consider who you place next to whom. It turns out that the docile garden plant isn’t as passive as widely assumed, at least not with strangers. Researchers at McMaster University have found that plants get fiercely competitive when forced to share their pot with strangers of the same species, but they’re accommodating when potted with their siblings.

The study appears today in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters.

“The ability to recognize and favour kin is common in animals, but this is the first time it has been shown in plants” said Susan Dudley, associate professor of biology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada. “When plants share their pots, they get competitive and start growing more roots, which allows them to grab water and mineral nutrients before their neighbours get them. It appears, though, that they only do this when sharing a pot with unrelated plants; when they share a pot with family they don’t increase their root growth. Because differences between groups of strangers and groups of siblings only occurred when they shared a pot, the root interactions may provide a cue for kin recognition.”

Though they lack cognition and memory, the study shows plants are capable of complex social behaviours such as altruism towards relatives, says Dudley. Like humans, the most interesting behaviours occur beneath the surface.

Dudley and her student, Amanda File, observed the behavior in sea rocket (Cakile edentula), a member of the mustard family native to beaches throughout North America, including the Great Lakes.

So should gardeners arrange their plants like they would plan the seating at a dinner party?

“Gardeners have known for a long time that some pairs of species get along better than others, and scientists are starting to catch up with why that happens,” says Dudley. “What I’ve found is that plants from the same mother may be more compatible with each other than with plants of the same species that had different mothers. The more we know about plants, the more complex their interactions seem to be, so it may be as hard to predict the outcome as when you mix different people at a party.”

 

Source: phys.org

Plants Energy Through Quantum Entanglement

Plants Energy Through Quantum Entanglement:

Plants Energy Through Quantum Entanglement

Plants Energy Through Quantum Entanglement

 

Biophysical theorize that plants exploit the mysterious world of quantum entanglement in photosynthesis . The evidence to date has been purely circumstantial, but now scientists have discovered a characteristic of plants that can not be explained by classical physics .

They are like mini -computers, quantum capable of scanning all possible options in order to choose the most efficient paths or solutions . For plants, this means the ability to make the most of the energy they receive and then deliver that energy from leaves with almost perfect efficiency.

The theory is that plants have light collection macromolecules in cells that can transfer their energy through molecular vibrations – vibrations that have no equivalent in classical physics .

In the new study , researchers at UCL identified a specific feature in biological systems that can only be predicted by quantum physics. The team learned that the energy transfer in light-harvesting macromolecules is facilitated by specific vibrational motions of the chromophore . Quantum effects improve the efficiency of plant photosynthesis in a way that classical physics can not afford.

WiFi Kills House Plants

WiFi Kills House Plants:

 

WiFi Kills House Plants

WiFi Kills House Plants

 

Are you slowly killing your houseplants? Probably! But there might be a reason (other than neglect) why they’re all yellow and wilty: your Wi-Fi router.

An experiment by a handful of high school students in Denmark has sparked some serious international interest in the scientific community.

Five ninth-grade girls at Hjallerup School in North Jutland, Denmark, noticed they had trouble concentrating after sleeping with their mobile phones at their bedsides. They tried to figure out why. The school obviously doesn’t have the equipment to test human brain waves, so the girls decided to do a more rudimentary experiment.

They placed six trays of garden cress seeds next to Wi-Fi routers that emitted roughly the same microwave radiation as a mobile phone. Then they placed six more trays of seeds in a separate room without routers. The girls controlled both environments for room temperature, sunlight and water.

After 12 days, they found the garden cress seeds in the routerless room had exploded into bushy greenery, while the seeds next to the Wi-Fi routers were brown, shriveled, and even mutated. See for yourself:
Photo by Kim Horsevad

Teacher Kim Horsevad told the Daily Dot that her students did the test twice with the same results. She was quick to point out that while the students did the experiment to test only one variable to the best of their ability, it is a high school experiment and this isn’t a professional study…