Root Canals Linked 97% Of All Terminal Cancer Patients

Root Canal linked to 97% of all Terminal Cancer Patients

97% of all Terminal Cancer Patients Root Canal linked to 97% of all Terminal Cancer Patients

Root-canaled teeth are essentially “dead” teeth that can become silent incubators for highly toxic anaerobic bacteria that can, under certain conditions, make their way into your bloodstream to cause a number of serious medical conditions—many not appearing until decades later.

Most of these toxic teeth feel and look fine for many years, which make their role in systemic disease even harder to trace back.

Sadly, the vast majority of dentists are oblivious to the serious potential health risks they are exposing their patients to, risks that persist for the rest of their patients’ lives. The American Dental Association claims root canals have been proven safe, but they have NO published data or actual research to substantiate this claim.

Fortunately, I had some early mentors like Dr. Tom Stone and Dr. Douglas Cook, who educated me on this issue nearly 20 years ago. Were it not for a brilliant pioneering dentist who, more than a century ago, made the connection between root-canaled teeth and disease, this underlying cause of disease may have remained hidden to this day. The dentist’s name was Weston Price — regarded by many as the greatest dentist of all time.

Most dentists would be doing an enormous service to public health if they familiarized themselves with the work of Dr. Weston Pricei. Unfortunately, his work continues to be discounted and suppressed by medical and dental professionals alike.

Dr. Price was a dentist and researcher who traveled the world to study the teeth, bones, and diets of native populations living without the “benefit” of modern food. Around the year 1900, Price had been treating persistent root canal infections and became suspicious that root-canaled teeth always remained infected, in spite of treatments. Then one day, he recommended to a woman, wheelchair bound for six years, to have her root canal tooth extracted, even though it appeared to be fine.

She agreed, so he extracted her tooth and then implanted it under the skin of a rabbit. The rabbit amazingly developed the same crippling arthritis as the woman and died from the infection 10 days later. But the woman, now free of the toxic tooth, immediately recovered from her arthritis and could now walk without even the assistance of a cane.

Price discovered that it’s mechanically impossible to sterilize a root-canaled (e.g. root-filled) tooth.

He then went on to show that many chronic degenerative diseases originate from root-filled teeth—the most frequent being heart and circulatory diseases. He actually found 16 different causative bacterial agents for these conditions. But there were also strong correlations between root-filled teeth and diseases of the joints, brain and nervous system.

Dr. Price went on to write two groundbreaking books in 1922 detailing his research into the link between dental pathology and chronic illness. Unfortunately, his work was deliberately buried for 70 years, until finally one endodontist named George Meinig recognized the importance of Price’s work and sought to expose the truth.

 

Source:  humansarefree.com

Microbes living in the skin

Microbes living in the skin of patients with primary immunodeficiencies:

Microbes living in the skin of patients with primary immunodeficiencies:

Microbes living in the skin of patients with primary immunodeficiencies:

Our skin is home to millions of microorganisms that cause disease, however, if our immune system influences these microbial communities to prevent the disease is unknown . In a study published online in Genome Research, researchers have explored the microbes that live on the skin of patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases of the skin eczema .

The human body contains many microbes , some of which are necessary for healthy bodily functions including digestion . Others, like some microbes living on our skin , may be pathogenic . Previous studies investigated how these microbes educate and shape the human immune system. It is not known , however , if the immune system influences the types of microbes that live on the skin and thus potentially prevent disease . ” In addition to questions about how microbes affect human host, there is interest in understanding how the human host affects the microbes that cause our skin to your home,” said Heidi Kong National Cancer Institute ( NCI ) and co -senior author of the study.

To study this, the authors recruited patients with reduced as a result of rare genetic defects immune function. Despite the diversity of the disease -causing mutations in patients, all patients share a skin condition eczema type . Scientists identified the microbes of the skin of patients by sequencing of microbial DNA from skin smears . Immunocompromised patients had types of bacteria and fungi in the skin that are not found in healthy individuals , suggesting the patients skin was more permissive for the growth of microbes . “Our findings suggest that the human body, including your immune system , limitations and potentially selects which bacteria and fungi can inhabit the skin,” Kong said.

Interestingly , the sites of the skin especially prone to the disease showed significant differences in microbial diversity , or the number of different types of microbes present in immundeficient patients. The skin on your elbow , for example, had fewer types of microbes that found in healthy individuals, while the skin behind the ear had more types of microbes. The authors suggest that an imbalance in the microbial diversity in a given site may contribute to the disease. Also, ” communities of bacteria and fungi on the skin of patients with primary immunodeficiency are more likely to change over time ,” said co -author Julie Segre of the National Institute of Human Genome Research (NHGRI ) .

Immunocompromised patients generally had similar microbial communities much more throughout the body, which are often different in healthy individuals . The authors suggest correcting diversity of microbes on the skin , not only the orientation pathogens, may help in the treatment of disease.

Although individuals in this study have rare genetic disorders , this research could have implications for patients with temporary problems in immune function , such as cancer patients and transplant recipients , and may inform the use of preventive antibiotics administered to these patients .

Injecting neural stem cells bring back feeling for the paralysed

Stem cells bring back feeling for paralysed patients:

Stem cells bring back feeling for paralysed patients

Stem cells bring back feeling for paralysed patients

For the first time, people with broken spines have recovered feeling in previously paralysed areas after receiving injections of neural stem cells. Three people with paralysis received injections of 20 million neural stem cells directly into the injured region of their spinal cord. The cells, acquired from donated fetal brain tissue, were injected between four and eight months after the injuries happened. The patients also received a temporary course of immunosuppressive drugs to limit rejection of the cells. None of the three felt any sensation below their nipples before the treatment. Six months after therapy, two of them had sensations of touch and heat between their chest and belly button. The third patient has not seen any change. “The fact we’ve seen responses to light touch, heat and electrical impulses so far down in two of the patients is very unexpected,” says Stephen Huhn of StemCells, the company in Newark, California, developing and testing the treatment. “They’re really close to normal in those areas now in their sensitivity,” he adds. “We are very intrigued to see that patients have gained considerable sensory function,” says Armin Curt of Balgrist University Hospital in Zurich, Switzerland, where the patients were treated, and principal investigator in the trial. The data are preliminary, but “these sensory changes suggest that the cells may be positively impacting recovery”, says Curt, who presented the results today in London at the annual meeting of the International Spinal Cord Society. Persistent gains. The patients are the first three of 12 who will eventually receive the therapy. The remaining recipients will have less extensive paralysis. “The sensory gains, first detected at three months post-transplant, have now persisted and evolved at six months after transplantation,” says Huhn. “We clearly need to collect much more data to demonstrate efficacy, but our results so far provide a strong rationale to persevere with the clinical development of our stem cells for spinal injury,” he says. “We need to keep monitoring these patients to see if feeling continues to affect lower segments of their bodies,” says Huhn. “These are results after only six months, and we will follow these patients for many years.” Huhn says that the company has “compelling data” from animal studies that the donated cells can repair nerves within broken spines. There could be several reasons why the stem cells improve sensitivity, says Huhn. They might help to restore myelin insulation to damaged nerves, improving the communication of signals to and from the brain. Or they could be enhancing the function of existing nerves, replacing them entirely or reducing the inflammation that hampers repair. Abandoned trial. The announcement comes almost a year after the world’s only other trial to test stem cells for spinal injury was suspended. Geron of Menlo Park, California, had injected neural stem cells derived from embryonic stem cells into four people with spinal injuries when it announced that it was going to focus on cancer therapies instead. The company also abandoned its other stem-cell programmes combating diabetes, heart disease and arthritis. Huhn hopes that the results from the StemCells trial will revive the enthusiasm that evaporated following Geron’s bombshell. “It’s the first time we’ve seen a signal of some beneficial effect, so we’re moving in the right direction, and towards a proof of concept,” he says. The news was welcomed by other pioneers of neural stem-cell research. “It looks encouraging and has some parallels with what we’ve seen in our trial in stroke patients,” says Michael Hunt, CEO of ReNeuron, in Guildford, UK, which in 2010 became the first company in the world to treat strokes with stem cells. They appear to be making progress, and that’s good for the stem-cell field generally, and for neural stem-cell research in particular,” says Hunt. He says that seven people who have had strokes have now been treated, and that some have shown signs of functional improvement without adverse effects. “It’s early days, and we are proceeding cautiously before hopefully moving to more substantive trials,” says Hunt. “These initial data certainly indicate that stem-cell transplantation may help remediate some of the severe functional loss associated with spinal cord injury,” says George Bittner of the University of Texas at Austin, who has developed a polymer-based system for rapid treatment of damaged nerves. But, he says, a single mode of treatment is unlikely to be enough to restore function after spinal cord injuries. We will need “combinations of approaches including stem cells, polymer-based treatments, retraining and physical therapy”. Other researchers were intrigued but cautious. “It’s work in progress,” says Wagih El Masri, a spinal specialist at the Midlands Centre for Spinal Injuries in Oswestry, UK, who attended Curt’s presentation. “We need larger numbers of patients treated to confirm whether this interesting finding has any future.” He says that about 3 per cent of patients show similar improvements spontaneously at about 6 months, but seldom beyond that. Testing the therapy on patients who were injured more than six months before would help to confirm that the stem cells are responsible for the results.