Majority of American’s are now Obese

Most American's are Obese

Most American’s are Obese

The number of overweight and obese adults in the United States continues to rise, according to a new study that’s found more than two-thirds of adult Americans aged 25 years or older are now overweight or obese.

The research analysed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which ran from 2007 to 2012, and included information on a sample of 15,208 men and women. Based on the data, the researchers estimate that 39.96 percent of US men (36.3 million) are overweight and 35.04 percent (31.8 million) are obese.

 For women, the estimates are 29.74 percent (28.9 million) of them are overweight, while 36.84 percent (35.8 million) are obese. If you do the maths, sure enough, the number of obese adult Americans (67.6 million) now eclipses those who are only overweight (65.2 million).

What’s so remarkable about the research, conducted by the Washington University School of Medicine and published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, is just how stark the numbers are for the US population. Every three in four men is overweight or obese, and the same can be said for two out of every three women.

In other words, people in healthy weight ranges in the US make up only a distinct minority of the population, especially when you consider that some portion of the remainder in these figures will be people who are actually underweight.

The researchers found the African American community has the biggest problem with obesity – affecting 39 percent of black men and 57 percent of black women – followed by Mexican Americans and then whites.

A similar study was published back in 1999, finding that 63 percent of men and 55 percent of women aged 25 and older were overweight or obese, so clearly the problem has only gotten worse over the last two decades, despite efforts from the government and the health community to educate people on how to take care of themselves when it comes to food and lifestyle choices.

“This is a wakeup call to implement policies and practices designed to combat overweight and obesity,” said Lin Yang, the study’s lead, in a statement. “An effort that spans multiple sectors must be made to stop or reverse this trend that is compromising and shortening the lives of many.”

Scary stuff, but hopefully this latest research will help galvanise efforts to turn weights around in the US and put healthy eating and living squarely back on the agenda.

 

Source:  sciencealert.com

Women Are Obese Before Pregnancy

Nearly 1 in 4 Women Are Obese Before Pregnancy:

Pregnant-Woman

Pregnant-Woman

Nearly 1 in 4 women now are obese when they become pregnant, according to a new study that includes information from most of the United States.

Researchers analyzed birth certificates from 36 states and Washington D.C. in 2011, which listed how much the mother weighed before she became pregnant.

On average, 23.4 percent of mothers in these states were obese — meaning they had a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater — when they became pregnant, according to the report, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Utah had the lowest rate of obesity before pregnancy, at 18.0 percent, while South Carolina had the highest, at 28.6 percent.

Mothers were more likely to be obese if they were over age 20, compared with younger mothers. Black and Hispanic women were also more likely to be obese than white women, the report said.

Given the current high rate of obesity in the United States (nearly 36 percent of U.S. adults are obese), it’s not surprising that nearly 25 percent of mothers are obese, said Dr. Jill Rabin, chief of ambulatory care, obstetrics and gynecology at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y., who was not involved in the report. However, Rabin pointed out that the study did not include information from all U.S. states, so it is not representative of the whole population.

Still, “it’s important for women to normalize their body weight before they become pregnant,” to reduce pregnancy risks for themselves and their babies, Rabin said.

Being overweight or obese during pregnancy is linked with an increased risk of gestational diabetes, cesarean delivery and preeclampsia (high blood pressure) for the mother; as well as prematurity, stillbirth and excessive weight at birth for the fetus, according to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

Rabin said she recommends that women who are already obese when they become pregnant speak with their OB-GYN to make sure they gain the appropriate amount of weight for their health and their baby during pregnancy.

The Institute of Medicine recommends normal-weight women (BMI between 18.5 and 24.9) gain 25 to 35 pounds during pregnancy, and underweight women (BMI of less than 18.5) gain 28 to 40 pounds, but overweight woman (BMI between 25 and 29.9) gain 15 to 25 pounds, and obese women (BMI of 30 and over) gain 11 to 20 pounds.

Women who are overweight or obese during pregnancy should be offered nutrition counseling, and encouraged to follow an exercise program, ACOG says.