Root Canals Linked 97% Of All Terminal Cancer Patients

Root Canal linked to 97% of all Terminal Cancer Patients

97% of all Terminal Cancer Patients Root Canal linked to 97% of all Terminal Cancer Patients

Root-canaled teeth are essentially “dead” teeth that can become silent incubators for highly toxic anaerobic bacteria that can, under certain conditions, make their way into your bloodstream to cause a number of serious medical conditions—many not appearing until decades later.

Most of these toxic teeth feel and look fine for many years, which make their role in systemic disease even harder to trace back.

Sadly, the vast majority of dentists are oblivious to the serious potential health risks they are exposing their patients to, risks that persist for the rest of their patients’ lives. The American Dental Association claims root canals have been proven safe, but they have NO published data or actual research to substantiate this claim.

Fortunately, I had some early mentors like Dr. Tom Stone and Dr. Douglas Cook, who educated me on this issue nearly 20 years ago. Were it not for a brilliant pioneering dentist who, more than a century ago, made the connection between root-canaled teeth and disease, this underlying cause of disease may have remained hidden to this day. The dentist’s name was Weston Price — regarded by many as the greatest dentist of all time.

Most dentists would be doing an enormous service to public health if they familiarized themselves with the work of Dr. Weston Pricei. Unfortunately, his work continues to be discounted and suppressed by medical and dental professionals alike.

Dr. Price was a dentist and researcher who traveled the world to study the teeth, bones, and diets of native populations living without the “benefit” of modern food. Around the year 1900, Price had been treating persistent root canal infections and became suspicious that root-canaled teeth always remained infected, in spite of treatments. Then one day, he recommended to a woman, wheelchair bound for six years, to have her root canal tooth extracted, even though it appeared to be fine.

She agreed, so he extracted her tooth and then implanted it under the skin of a rabbit. The rabbit amazingly developed the same crippling arthritis as the woman and died from the infection 10 days later. But the woman, now free of the toxic tooth, immediately recovered from her arthritis and could now walk without even the assistance of a cane.

Price discovered that it’s mechanically impossible to sterilize a root-canaled (e.g. root-filled) tooth.

He then went on to show that many chronic degenerative diseases originate from root-filled teeth—the most frequent being heart and circulatory diseases. He actually found 16 different causative bacterial agents for these conditions. But there were also strong correlations between root-filled teeth and diseases of the joints, brain and nervous system.

Dr. Price went on to write two groundbreaking books in 1922 detailing his research into the link between dental pathology and chronic illness. Unfortunately, his work was deliberately buried for 70 years, until finally one endodontist named George Meinig recognized the importance of Price’s work and sought to expose the truth.

 

Source:  humansarefree.com

Anxiety Linked to Risk of Stroke

Anxiety Linked to Risk of Stroke:

 

Anxiety Linked to Risk of Stroke

Anxiety Linked to Risk of Stroke

 

 

 

A study is the first to link researchers anxiety and stroke independent of other factors such as depression . Anxiety is one of the most common problems of mental health. Symptoms include worried, stressed , nervous or tense feeling.

A period of 22 years, researchers studied a nationally representative group of 6,019 people aged 25-74 in the first National Health Examination Survey and Nutrition.

Participants underwent an interview and took blood tests, medical examinations and complete psychological questionnaires to measure levels of anxiety and depression . Researchers studied strokes through the reports of the hospital or nursing home , and death certificates. After accounting for other factors , they found that even a modest increase in anxiety were associated with an increased risk of stroke.

People in the highest third anxiety symptoms had a 33 percent higher risk of stroke than those with the lowest levels .

” Everyone has some anxiety from time to time . But when is high and / or chronic, can have an effect on the vasculature years down the road ,” said Maya Lambiase , Ph.D. , study author and cardiovascular medicine behavior researcher at the Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Pittsburgh.

People with high levels of anxiety are more likely to smoke and be physically inactive, possibly explaining part of the link of anxiety – trait . The levels of stress hormones , heart rate or blood pressure could also be factors , Lambiase said.

In previous work , researchers found that depression was associated with an increased risk of stroke , which is the No. 4 murderer and a leading cause of disability in the United States. In contrast to anxiety , depression is a persistent feeling of hopelessness, discouragement and lack of energy, among other symptoms.

Anger Disorders Linked to Inflammation

Anger Disorders May Be Linked to Inflammation:

 

Anger Disorders May Be Linked to Inflammation

Anger Disorders May Be Linked to Inflammation

For some people, violent behavior and anger may be linked with inflammation in their bodies, a new study finds.

The researchers measured markers of inflammation in the blood of 70 people diagnosed with intermittent explosive disorder (IED), a condition that involves repeated episodes of impulsive aggression and temper tantrums, as seen in road rage, domestic abuse and throwing or breaking objects.

The study also included 61 people diagnosed with psychiatric disorders not involving aggression, and 67 participants with no psychiatric disorder, who served as controls.

The results showed a direct relationship between levels of two markers of inflammation and impulsivity and aggression in people with IED, but not in control participants. The results held after controlling for lifestyle factors and other differences between groups of participants, according to the study published today (Dec. 18) in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

How the link may work remains unclear, the researchers said.

“We don’t know yet if the inflammation triggers aggression, or aggressive feelings set off inflammation, but it’s a powerful indication that the two are biologically connected, and a damaging combination,” said study researcher Dr. Emil Coccaro, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Chicago.

The finding doesn’t mean that taking anti-inflammatory medication such as aspirin would calm an angry person. But it does open a new direction for future studies, which could focus on whether reducing inflammation could eventually reduce aggression.

People with IED overreact to stressful situations with uncontrollable anger and rage. The condition affects people’s professional and social lives, and may put them at higher risks for other mental problems, such as depression, anxiety and alcohol or drug abuse, the researchers said. People with IED also face increased risk for medical problems, such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes, they said.

Treatment for IED includes mood stabilizers and psychotherapy, but they are not always successful for all patients, Coccaro said.

In the study, the researchers focused on two markers of inflammation, called C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). CRP is produced by the liver in response to an infection or injury, whereas IL6 is secreted by white blood cells to stimulate immune responses. Blood levels of both CRP and IL-6 rise when the body’s inflammatory response is activated.

The study also found that both CRP and IL-6 levels were higher, on average, in people with IED, compared with other participants, and that both markers were particularly elevated in people who had more aggressive behaviors in the past.

Animal studies have shown that introducing similar inflammatory proteins into the brains of cats and mice increase their aggressive behavior. It is possible that in humans, too, some of the elevated proteins in the blood find their way to the brain and affect brain regions that control aggressive behavior, the researchers said.

Dyslexia brain communication breakdown

 

 

Dyslexic people have trouble linking written symbols with corresponding speech sounds.

 

Dyslexia linked to brain communication breakdown

Dyslexia linked to brain communication breakdown

Dyslexia may be caused by impaired connections between auditory and speech centres of the brain, according to a study published today in Science1. The research could help to resolve conflicting theories about the root causes of the disorder, and lead to targeted interventions.

When people learn to read, their brains make connections between written symbols and components of spoken words. But people with dyslexia seem to have difficulty identifying and manipulating the speech sounds to be linked to written symbols. Researchers have long debated whether the underlying representations of these sounds are disrupted in the dyslexic brain, or whether they are intact but language-processing centres are simply unable to access them properly.

A team led by Bart Boets, a clinical psychologist at the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium, analysed brain scans and found that phonetic representations of language remain intact in adults with dyslexia, but may be less accessible than in controls because of deficits in brain connectivity.

“The authors took a really inventive and thoughtful approach,” says John Gabrieli, a neuroscientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “They got a pretty clear answer.”

Communication channels

Boets and his team used a technique called multivoxel pattern analysis to study fine-scale brain signals as people listened to a battery of linguistic fragments such as ‘ba’ and ‘da’. To the researchers’ surprise, neural activity in the primary and secondary auditory cortices of participants with dyslexia showed consistently distinct signals for different sounds.

But images of dyslexic people’s brains revealed reduced structural integrity of the white-matter tracts linking the auditory cortices and the left inferior frontal gyrus — a brain area involved in language processing, including speech production. Even when the study participants were not doing any tasks, activity in these areas was less correlated in the brains of the dyslexic people than in the controls, suggesting that they had weaker communication between their auditory and speech centres.

Together, these findings suggest that dyslexic people do not have distorted neural representations of speech sounds; rather, “the problem seems to be in pathways down the road that help us assemble those sounds and produce those sounds when we read out loud”, explains Guinevere Eden, a neuroscientist at Georgetown University in Washington DC.

Boets cautions that studying adults can reveal only the end result of atypical development; dyslexic people could have distorted phonetic representations early in life. But, he says, the results argue that weakened connections between specific brain regions have an important role. Ultimately, Boets hopes that the insights could lead to improvements to treatments and exercises for dyslexia, which historically have focused on strengthening phonetic representations.

“It should be possible to design strategies to specifically improve the connections,” says Boets.

Monsanto’s Linked to Serious Soil Damage

Monsanto’s Roundup Pesticide Linked to Serious Soil Damage:

Glyphosate

Glyphosate

Glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup pesticide, is being linked to damaged soil and roots of treated plants, finds 15 years of study, according to a representative from the USDA. Fungal root disease has increased among farmers using the popular Roundup pesticide, particularly on the Monsanto genetically modified Roundup Ready seeds, according to Bob Kremer, a microbiologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service. GM corn and soybeans represent a majority of Roundup dependent crops grown in the U.S., and this “invisible” plight of changes in soil bacteria and increased presence of fungus could indicate larger problems ahead with Monsanto’s Roundup Ready and other GMO seeds. With so many farmers in the U.S. now dependent on glyphosate pesticides and genetically modified seeds, the implications of widespread soil fungus are tremendous as a resistant fungus could devastate farms. The presence of newly discovered glyphosate resistant “superweeds” are already taking a toll on farmers’ crops and machinery. The research also revealed that the controversial genetically altered crops are not showing signs of yielding more than conventional crops, despite that being one of the key selling points of genetically modified seed manufacturers including Monsanto. Nutrient deficiencies linked to the root disease problems are likely a limiting factor, Kremer says, and the fungal diseases could limit crop health and production even further in the future warranting significantly more research. Among the growing concerns over heavy use of glyphosate based pesticides are links to human and livestock health risks including cancer, fertility issues, birth defects, organ damage and neurological disorders.

Muscle strength early death

biceps

biceps

Men who were weak as teenagers are more likely to die young than their peers who had more muscle, a new study suggests. Swedish researchers sampled more than 1 million men over the course of 24 years from adolescence to adulthood studying how their strength as teens affected their likelihood to die prematurely. Boys with stronger arms, legs and a firmer grip, for example, were 20% to 35% less likely to die from causes such as suicide or disease as young adults, they found. There was link between cancer and muscular strength, according to the study, published Tuesday in BMJ. Boys with less muscular strength were more likely to be obese or have high blood pressure as adults causes that alone signal an increased risk of death. More than 26,000 men (about 2.3%) died during the study. Suicide was the most common cause of death among the sample.

Intelligence Linked to Ancient Genetic Accident

Origin of Intelligence and Mental Illness Linked to Ancient Genetic Accident

Origin of Intelligence and Mental Illness Linked to Ancient Genetic Accident

 

Researchers have identified the moment in history when the genes that enabled us to think and reason evolved. This point 500 million years ago provided our ability to learn complex skills, analyse situations and have flexibility in the way in which we think. Professor Seth Grant, of the University of Edinburgh, who led the research, said: “One of the greatest scientific problems is to explain how intelligence and complex behaviours arose during evolution.” The research, which is detailed in two papers in Nature Neuroscience, also shows a direct link between the evolution of behaviour and the origins of brain diseases. Scientists believe that the same genes that improved our mental capacity are also responsible for a number of brain disorders. “This ground breaking work has implications for how we understand the emergence of psychiatric disorders and will offer new avenues for the development of new treatments,” said John Williams, Head of Neuroscience and Mental Health at the Wellcome Trust, one of the study funders. The study shows that intelligence in humans developed as the result of an increase in the number of brain genes in our evolutionary ancestors. The researchers suggest that a simple invertebrate animal living in the sea 500 million years ago experienced a ‘genetic accident’, which resulted in extra copies of these genes being made. This animal’s descendants benefited from these extra genes, leading to behaviourally sophisticated vertebrates — including humans. The research team studied the mental abilities of mice and humans, using comparative tasks that involved identifying objects on touch-screen computers. Researchers then combined results of these behavioural tests with information from the genetic codes of various species to work out when different behaviours evolved. They found that higher mental functions in humans and mice were controlled by the  same genes. The study also showed that when these genes were mutated or damaged, they impaired higher mental functions. “Our work shows that the price of higher intelligence and more complex behaviours is more mental illness,” said Professor Grant. The researchers had previously shown that more than 100 childhood and adult brain diseases are caused by gene mutations. “We can now apply genetics and behavioural testing to help patients with these diseases,” said Dr Tim Bussey from Cambridge University, which was also involved in the study.