Multitasking lowers your IQ

Multitasking makes you stupid

Multitasking makes you stupid

Envisage the switched-on new-millennium male – his iPhone in one hand while he switches between emails and business reports on his computer screen – a vision of productivity in this wondrous age of apps.

Wrong. He’s seriously dumbing himself down.

Several scientific studies around the world have concluded the brain doesn’t switch tasks like an expert juggler. Quite the opposite. It can reduce your IQ by as much as 10 points, cause mental blanks and reduce your productivity by 40 per cent.

Not a single study in psychology shows that women are better than men at multitasking, says Dr Julia Irwin, senior lecturer in psychology at Macquarie University.

What about women? They’re legends at multitasking and concentrating on several things at once. Nope. Not a single psychological study concludes women are better at multitasking than men, and some research indicates they can be worse.

One Australian researcher in the field, Dr Julia Irwin, senior lecturer in psychology at Macquarie University, advises people to abandon their apps, turn off their mobiles and ignore their emails while they concentrate on one task at a time. “At the end of the day, they will have been a lot more productive,” she says.

“If you’re sending an email while also working on an assignment, one downside is that withdrawing your attention from one task to another creates a split-second in which the brain’s in no-man’s land. It’s called a post-refractory pause.

“Over time these pauses add up and can mean your mind wasn’t on the job for a couple of minutes.”

Dr Irwin says such mental blanks can be dangerous when doing something of critical importance like keeping an eye out for a child in a playground. “If, in that pause, a child wobbles on their bicycle, it’s obviously a worry. You just haven’t got your attention on it.

“The other aspect is, if you’re deeply immersed in writing something and turn your attention to an email that’s just come in, there are studies that show it can take you up to 15 minutes to get yourself back into that same degree of immersion.”

One early study by the Institute of Psychiatry in London involved more than 1000 workers and found multitasking with electronic media caused a temporary 10-point decrease in IQ – a worse effect than smoking marijuana or losing a night’s sleep.

The study’s leader, an adjunct professor at the University of Nevada, Dr Glenn Wilson, called it “informania”, a condition created by using multiple electronic devices and employers’ growing demands to tackle more than one task at a time.

“This is a very real and widespread phenomenon,” he told CNN. “We have found that this obsession with looking at messages, if unchecked, will damage a worker’s performance by reducing their mental sharpness. Companies should encourage a more balanced and appropriate way of working.”

Another study, by Professor David Meyer, director of the University of Michigan’s Brain Cognition and Action Laboratory, concluded that even brief mental blocks created by shifting between tasks cost as much as 40 per cent of someone’s productive time.

Dr Irwin’s own Australian research concludes clearly that in today’s multitasking multi-app world, people should turn off their devices when doing something that merits their full attention.

One of her studies also defies a widespread belief that women are better at multitasking. “One of the very first studies I did was with young students driving and either talking to passengers or on a mobile,” she says. “I thought, oh, the women are going to ace this, but the women actually scored worse on the phones than the men.

“When I looked in the literature, there is not a single study in psychology that shows that women are better at multitasking. But what I did find in the sociological literature is that they perform multiple tasks more often.

“This has  led to the belief that women are better at multitasking, but the more studies are done, the fewer differences they find between female and male brains.”

 

Source:  theage.com.au

High IQ and drug use

People that use drugs, are generally smarter than their counter parts:

High IQ linked to drug use

High IQ linked to drug use

The “Just Say No” generation was often told by parents and teachers that intelligent people didn’t use drugs.   Turns out, the adults may have been wrong.

A new British study finds children with high IQs are more likely to use drugs as adults than people who score low on IQ tests as children.  The data come from the 1970 British Cohort Study, which has been following thousands of people over decades.  The kids’ IQs were tested at the ages of 5, 10 and 16.  The study also asked about drug use and looked at education and other socioeconomic factors.  Then when participants turned 30, they were asked whether they had used drugs such as marijuana, cocaine and heroin in the past year.

Researchers discovered men with high childhood IQs were up to two times more likely to use illegal drugs than their lower-scoring counterparts.  Girls with high IQs were up to three times more likely to use drugs as adults.  A high IQ is defined as a score between 107 and 158.  An average IQ is 100. The study appears in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

The lead researcher says he isn’t surprised by the findings.  “Previous research found for the most part people with high IQs lead a healthy life, but that they are more likely to drink to excess as adults,” says James White a psychologist at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom.

It’s not clear why people with high childhood IQs are more likely to use illegal drugs.  “We suspect they may be more open to new experiences and are more sensation seeking,” says White.  In the paper, White and his co-author also mention other studies that find high IQ kids may use drugs because they are bored or to cope with being different.

That seems to ring true for one of my childhood classmates. Tracey Helton Mitchell was one of the smartest kids in my middle school. But, by the time she was in her early 20’s, Tracey was a heroin addict. I found out while flipping channels one sleepless night and stumbled upon the documentary “Black Tar Heroin.”

“I was confident in my abilities but there was a dissonance,” says Tracey, with whom I recently reconnected.  “No matter what I did, what I said, where I went, I was never comfortable with the shell I carried called myself.”

 

Source: CNN.Com

Smoking increases child being gay

A woman’s lifestyle during pregnancy is directly linked to  whether they may be gay, or having an impact on their IQ

 

A neuroscientist has claimed a woman's lifestyle during pregnancy is directly linked to the development of their children, influencing whether they may be gay and having an impact on their IQ

A neuroscientist has claimed a woman’s lifestyle during pregnancy is directly linked to the development of their children, influencing whether they may be gay and having an impact on their IQ

 

Women who smoke or who lead a stressful life during pregnancy can affect sexuality and your child’s IQ , a neuroscientist said .
The lifestyle of a pregnant woman to have an impact on the development of their babies woman – drinking, drugs and even live in an area with a lot of pollution that affects children in later life .

Dick Swaab , professor of neurobiology at the University of Amsterdam , suggests drinking and taking drugs can lower the IQ of a child while taking synthetic hormones and smoking can increase the likelihood of being lesbian or bisexual girls.

Having more older brothers are also thought to increase the possibility that the boys are gay, possibly by the development of the immune system of the mother to be stronger to male hormones with each child born replies .

” Prenatal exposure to nicotine and amphetamines increases the likelihood of daughters lesbians”

“Pregnant women who suffer from stress are also more likely to have gay children of both sexes, as the high level of the stress hormone cortisol affects the production of sex hormones in the fetus. ”

He said the brain of the fetus begins to develop within two weeks , with all that introduces toxins in the body that has an impact on this development. Studies show women taking synthetic estrogen between 1939 and 1960 to reduce the chances of miscarriage had a higher probability of bisexuality and lesbianism in her daughters.

Swaab added: ” In women who drink heavily , cells that were destined to migrate through the fetal brain may end up leaving the brain as a whole. ”

Living in a hot zone is linked to an increased risk of autism.

Swaab said lifestyle factors are only one influence , with genetics play the biggest role , but said the research shows that brain development during pregnancy is directly related to the lifestyles of adults.