Immortality Offered To Billionaires

Russian Project Offers Immortality To Billionaires:

Russian Project Offers Immortality To Billionaires

Russian Project Offers Immortality To Billionaires

Interested in a second life as a robot? The goal is to achieve the ability to upload an individual’s mind into an artificial surrogate, and offer it as a service to the planet’s richest individuals in a decade or so. A Russian entrepreneur who heads a hi-tech research project called ‘Avatar’ has contacted billionaires to offer them immortality. Dmitry Itskov claims he will personally oversee their immortality process, in exchange for an undisclosed fee. Itskov, a media entrepreneur, claims to have hired 30 scientists to reach this goal – and aims to transplant a human brain into a robot body within 10 years. “You have the ability to finance the extension of your own life up to immortality. Our civilization has come very close to the creation of such technologies: it’s not a science fiction fantasy. It is in your power to make sure that this goal will be achieved in your lifetime,” says Itskov in a letter delivered to billionaires listed in Forbes magazine. The initiative is opening its San Francisco office this summer, and will be launching a social media project connecting scientists around the world. ‘The next effort of science will be to create a new body for the human being,’ says Itskov, speaking at the Global Future 2045 conference. ‘It will have a perfect brain-machine interface to allow control and a human brain life support system so the brain can survive outside the body.’

Immortality found in nature

“Immortal” Jellyfish Swarm World’s Oceans:

Jellyfish

Jellyfish

A potentially “immortal” jellyfish species that can age backward—the Benjamin Button of the deep—is silently invading the world’s oceans, swarm by swarm, a recent study says.  Like the Brad Pitt movie character, the immortal jellyfish transforms from an adult back into a baby, but with an added bonus: Unlike Benjamin Button, the jellyfish can do it over and over again—though apparently only as an emergency measure.

About as wide as a human pinky nail when fully grown, the immortal jellyfish (scientific name: Turritopsis dohrnii) was discovered in the Mediterranean Sea in 1883. But its unique ability was not discovered until the 1990s.  How the Jellyfish Becomes “Immortal”.  Turritopsis typically reproduces the old-fashioned way, by the meeting of free-floating sperm and eggs. And most of the time they die the old-fashioned way too.  But when starvation, physical damage, or other crises arise, “instead of sure death, [Turritopsis] transforms all of its existing cells into a younger state,” said study author Maria Pia Miglietta, a researcher at Pennsylvania State University.  The jellyfish turns itself into a bloblike cyst, which then develops into a polyp colony, essentially the first stage in jellyfish life.  The jellyfish’s cells are often completely transformed in the process. Muscle cells can become nerve cells or even sperm or eggs.  Through asexual reproduction, the resulting polyp colony can spawn hundreds of genetically identical jellyfish—near perfect copies of the original adult.  This unique approach to hardship may be helping Turritopsis swarms spread throughout the world’s oceans.