Forty two thousand gun death in Brazil

Gun Deaths

Gun Deaths

A report on violence in Brazil says around 42,000 people were shot dead in 2012 – the highest figures for gun crime in 35 years. The study, by the UN and the government on the most recent available data, said almost all the deaths were murders.

More than half of those killed were young men under the age of 30 – two-thirds were described as black.

The Brazilian Congress is debating a controversial bill that would limit access to firearms.

Gun crime murders have been dropping in the states of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo but rising in the north and northeast of the country.

The northern state of Alagoas is the most violent, with fifty-five gun deaths per hundred thousand inhabitants.

The report says a slow justice system and flawed police investigations as well as the widespread availability of firearms are to blame.

It says Brazil has become a society which tolerates guns to resolve “all sorts of disputes, in most cases for very banal and circumstantial reasons.”

A law to ban the carrying of guns in public and control illegal ownership came into effect in 2004.

It tightened rules on gun permits and create a national firearms register, with strict penalties for owning an unregistered gun.

 

Source:  BBC.com

Wall Street Executives Say illegal behavior Is Necessary

Many Wall Street Executives Say Wrongdoing Is Necessary:

Many Wall Street Executives Say Wrongdoing Is Necessary

Many Wall Street Executives Say Wrongdoing Is Necessary

Capitalism-hating radicals claim that our financial sector is awash with unethical and illegal behavior, which is not merely tolerated, but encouraged or even required for success. Many Wall Street leaders concur completely.

A quarter of Wall Street executives see wrongdoing as a key to success, according to a survey by whistle-blower law firm Labaton Sucharow released on Tuesday. In a survey of 500 senior executives in the United States and the UK, 26 percent of respondents said they had observed or had firsthand knowledge of wrongdoing in the workplace, while 24 percent said they believed financial services professionals may need to engage in unethical or illegal conduct to be successful.

Sixteen percent of respondents said they would commit insider trading if they could get away with it, according to Labaton Sucharow. And 30 percent said their compensation plans created pressure to compromise ethical standards or violate the law.

Comment: It’s not just now or Wall Street, fortunes have been made through unethical, immoral, or illegal means. A lot of early American fortunes came out of profiteering on the American revolution and the subsequent wars.  Similar profiteering, I’m sure, went on in other nations. American Industrialists like Rockefeller and Carnegie made their fortunes through brutal, unethical, and illegal business practices…then later became philanthropists and bought themselves better reputations.  And of course, there are economists that make the similar argument with regards to them – that it was necessary for them to behave illegally and unethically. You’ve got the fortunes made in the financial market today, which are almost exclusively based in fraud, unethical behavior, the revolving door between regulators and industry where everyone has a vested financial interest in ignoring the fraud & unethical behavior, and congress people who are owned outright.