Forty two thousand gun death in Brazil

Gun Deaths

Gun Deaths

A report on violence in Brazil says around 42,000 people were shot dead in 2012 – the highest figures for gun crime in 35 years. The study, by the UN and the government on the most recent available data, said almost all the deaths were murders.

More than half of those killed were young men under the age of 30 – two-thirds were described as black.

The Brazilian Congress is debating a controversial bill that would limit access to firearms.

Gun crime murders have been dropping in the states of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo but rising in the north and northeast of the country.

The northern state of Alagoas is the most violent, with fifty-five gun deaths per hundred thousand inhabitants.

The report says a slow justice system and flawed police investigations as well as the widespread availability of firearms are to blame.

It says Brazil has become a society which tolerates guns to resolve “all sorts of disputes, in most cases for very banal and circumstantial reasons.”

A law to ban the carrying of guns in public and control illegal ownership came into effect in 2004.

It tightened rules on gun permits and create a national firearms register, with strict penalties for owning an unregistered gun.

 

Source:  BBC.com

3-D Printed Magazine Lets You Fire Hundreds of Rounds

New 3-D Printed Rifle Magazine Lets You Fire Hundreds of Rounds:

New 3-D Printed Rifle Magazine Lets You Fire Hundreds of Rounds

New 3-D Printed Rifle Magazine Lets You Fire Hundreds of Rounds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In response to the upsurge in gun violence, politicians are proposing restrictions on the number of bullets that handgun and rifle magazines can hold. And just as they do, new printing technology blows holes right through that debate. The 3-D printing gunsmiths at Defense Distributed are about to release blueprints for an upgraded magazine that won’t degrade even after you fire hundreds of rounds. Meet the “Cuomo.” It’s a new printed magazine for your AR-15 rifle, soon to be available for download, and it holds 30 bullets. Upgrading an earlier design that didn’t hold up particularly well after extended use, it’s an unsubtle rejoinder to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, who recently signed a magazine-restriction law limiting mags to seven rounds. Defense Distributed is basically saying that if you’re not going to be allowed to buy larger magazines in the near future, you can print them yourself — if, that is, 3-D printed weapons don’t fall into legislators’ own crosshairs. In recent tests at a gun range near Austin, Texas, Defense Distributed fired a total of 342 rounds using the magazine with no issues, according to the group’s founder, Cody Wilson. The group fired 227 of those rounds using full automatic fire, while swapping out the barrels on the rifle to keep them cool. The group also uploaded a promotional video, seen above, demonstrating a portion of the test. “We had been making revisions to the file demonstrated in January, but it was at its core not a good file, so total redesign from scratch,” Wilson e-mails Danger Room from London, where he’s attending a conference for the Bitcoin digital currency. “The mag won’t fail in limited engagements,” he added. The problem with the first magazine, according to Wilson, were “slightly uneven dimensions,” including a magazine catch slot — where the magazine locks into the rifle — that caused repeated jams. The group also reverse-engineered the device, but found the magazine’s spring-loaded follower — which feeds bullets upwards as the rifle cycles through them — and its base plate had “tiny impractical parts.” It wasn’t really workable, so Wilson redesigned the shape and added a new follower. “Basically the mag is a total redesign,” he says. Defense Distributed emerged at the forefront of 3-D printed weapons last September after a printer leased by the group had its contract voided — and printer seized — by 3-D printer firm Stratasys. This kind of printing, or “additive manufacturing,” involves using layers of thermoplastics and computer-aided design files to construct everyday objects. The group’s move into printing magazines is a more recent shift. Printable magazine blueprints have been available online for more than a year, but most designs are crude and impractical. Defense Distributed also plans to produce a 40-round magazine for AK-47-type rifles. But some legislators urge restrictions on 3-D printed weapons, so technology doesn’t render new gun laws obsolete. Last month, Rep. Steve Israel of New York called for 3-D printed magazines to be banned. More broadly, magazines of more than 10 rounds were restricted until the 1994 Assault Weapons Ban expired in 2004. New York’s recent law banning magazines greater than seven rounds would also make Wilson’s magazine illegal — but difficult to control if getting one is as simple as printing it off the internet. Hosting may not be a problem. The group had early blueprints pulled from the Thingiverse printable file database last year by its owner, MakerBot industries, with another purge of gun parts to follow after the tragic mass shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut. But Defense Distributed has since set up its own online clearinghouse Defcad. “Since this project is really about open source software, we know we need to release strong, usable templates,” Wilson writes. “If we really want to encourage adoption and experimentation, we’ve got to start releasing workable STLs and reliable CAD files.” The upgraded printable magazine should be online at Defcad in the next few days.

 

 

3D Printed Gun Parts

Using 3-D Printers To Make Gun Parts Raises Alarms:

Using 3-D Printers To Make Gun Parts Raises Alarms

Using 3-D Printers To Make Gun Parts Raises Alarms

The 3-D printing industry has criticized the use of the technology for gun part making.
You may have heard about 3-D printing, a technological phenomenon that uses a robotic arm to build objects one layer at a time. As people get imaginative and create items in a one-stop-shop fashion, one more creation has been added to the printing line: gun parts. On the West Side of Manhattan, behind large glass windows, a dozen 3-D printers build plastic toys and jewelry. Hilary Brosnihan, a manager at 3DEA, an events company that sponsored a print pop-up store, says things are moving rapidly.
“This [3-D printing] is coming down the line; it’s coming down the line very quickly,” Brosnihan says. She also works as a toy manufacturer. The technology has boosted her business, but the idea of printing a gun horrifies her. She says most of her colleagues feel the same way.

Drugs Create Super-Soldier

5 Drugs Used to Create a Super-Soldier:

 

5 Drugs Used to Create a Super-Soldier

5 Drugs Used to Create a Super-Soldier

Even though Super-Soldiers might sound like a bad narrative from a sci-fi film, they are more real than ever in a world obsessed with technological and biological advancement. Forget about crazy scientists in abandoned castlesthese drugs are real and they really work too. These drugs aren’t locked away in Area 51 type secret government bases either, a lot of these drugs are actually available right now for anyone to buy.

 

1. XBD173 : Anxiety Killer

Shell shock, post traumatic stress, different names but the same meaning. XBD173 is a drug that can not only eradicate anxiety and fear but it can do it instantly without any side effects or withdrawal symptoms. In total 1 in 8 soldiers, who’ve fought in the Iraq war, suffer from post traumatic stress disorder which is over 10% of the armed forces. Removing anxiety would create fearless and unstoppable soldiers who wouldn’t be affected by any of war’s brutalities or cruelties.

2. Provigil : No More Sleep

Imagine a soldier that didn’t need to sleep or rest half as much as a ‘normal’ soldier did? Completely possible with Provigil (AKA Modafinil) which was initially created to deal with narcolepsy, shift work sleep disorder and excessive daytime sleepiness. The drug radically improves work rate and alertness which means even with less sleep or rest, a soldier can work harder and more effectively.

3. D-IX : Nazi Cocaine

D-IX is a cocaine based drug originally created by the Nazis under Hitler’s evil reign. Criminologist and expert Wolf Kemper said “It was Hitler’s last secret weapon to win a war he had already lost long ago”. The drug was initially tested on prisoners at the Sachsenhausen concentration camp, they were given 20kg packs to carry and which marched with for 90km without rest.

4. Valproic Acid : Super Survivors

When a soldier suffers an injury that causes rapid blood loss, the body’s reaction is to go into shock which will sustain life for a short time however, if the body stays in shock for more than a short time, it can lead to organ failure, and death can soon follow. Valproic acid causes 87% of blood loss victims to survive (well in cows at least) which means that it could be possible to survive for prolonged hours after a bad injury.

5. Select Androgen Receptor Modulators : Instant Muscle Mass

Anabolic steroids are simply concentrated amounts of testosterone that rapidly build muscle mass but scientists have never been able to completely rid undesired side effects, until now. SARMs are a new and improved version of anabolic steroids that allows huge muscle growth without any side effects, whilst a potential super soldier wouldn’t be the size of the Incredible Hulk or nearly as green, this almost overnight treatment could turn a scrawny bunch of boys into a bulky troop of men.

Police fatally kills man

Stanislaus deputy Tasers, fatally shoots man:

shooting

shooting

MODESTO, Calif. — Authorities are investigating the shooting death of a man by a Stanislaus County sheriff’s deputy who was responding to reports of a family dispute.  Sheriff’s officials say the deputy went to the home in the town of Keyes on Monday afternoon.  Sgt. Anthony Bejaran says the deputy first used a Taser on 32-year-old George Ramirez Jr. and called for backup. Moments later, the deputy reported that he fired shots.  Ramirez’s family told KCRA-TV that he was severely depressed and that they urged the deputy not to hurt him. George Ramirez Sr. says the deputy refused to listen and shot his son three times after he staggered back to his feet from the Tasering.  Sheriff’s officials declined comment on the family’s claims pending the investigation.