New chip incorporating ultra-low consumption

New chip consumes 50 million times less than a conventional light bulb:

New chip consumes 50 million times less than a conventional light bulb:

New chip consumes 50 million times less than a conventional light bulb:

 

 

Low consumption means the device can be powered by reducing energy collected from the environment ( light, vibrations , temperature variations , etc. . ) Thus, energy independence is achieved , as no batteries are required for operation .

The research , authored by Antonio López- Martín and Iñigo Cenoz -Villanueva , was awarded the prize for the best presentation at the 7th International Conference on Sensor Technology (ICTS ) . This is a major international forum in the field of sensor technology and applications; 188 works from 38 countries were submitted in this latest edition.

The winning paper was the result of the thesis project of telecommunication engineering student Cenoz – Iñigo Villanueva. His project was supervised by Antonio Lopez – Martin, Professor, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering and Deputy Director of the School of Industrial Engineering and Telecommunications .

Wireless sensor networks are the main application of the developed device. These networks are composed of two main elements: the sensor nodes that detect the parameters of the individual or the surroundings (temperature , humidity , heart rate , presence, etc. ) , and the actuators that trigger actions ( to switch devices on or outside , through the generation of neurological stimuli, etc. . ) Sensors and actuators communicate with each other and with other networks such as the Internet via radio waves without wires. It is the technology that in recent years it has boomed because of its many applications .

This research group Communications and Microwave Signal NUP / UPNA ‘ s was recognized again in 2012 to mark the 12th Talgo Award for Technological Innovation . On that occasion the winning project was aimed at providing an ecosystem of railroad with intelligence through wireless sensor networks for ultra low power consumption whenever possible driven by the available environmental energy in railway wagons themselves.

Britain unveil public electronic surveillance

 

British authorities unveil plan for mass electronic surveillance:

British authorities unveil plan for mass electronic surveillance

British authorities unveil plan for mass electronic surveillance

British authorities on Thursday unveiled an ambitious plan to log details about every email, phone call and text message in the U.K. And in a sharply worded editorial, the nation’s top law enforcement official accused those worried about the surveillance program of being either criminals or conspiracy theorists. Officials insist they’re not after content. They promise not to read emails or eavesdrop on phone calls without a warrant. But the surveillance proposed in the government’s 118-page draft bill would provide British authorities a remarkably rich picture of their citizens’ day-to-day lives. Home Office Secretary Theresa May said in an editorial published ahead of the bill’s unveiling that only evildoers should be frightened. “Our proposals are sensible and limited,” she wrote in the Sun, a mass-market daily. “They will give the police and some other agencies access to data about online communications to tackle crime, exactly as they do now with mobile phone calls and texts. Unless you are a criminal, then you’ve nothing to worry about from this new law.” Yet plenty of people were worried, including a senior lawmaker from Ms. May’s ruling Conservative Party. “This is a huge amount of information, very intrusive to collect on people,” lawmaker David Davis, one of the proposal’s most outspoken critics, told BBC radio. “It’s not content, but it’s incredibly intrusive.” Authorities and civil libertarians have been debating the plan for weeks, but Thursday marked the first time that the government itemized exactly what kinds of communication it wants to track, and how it plans to. The bill would force communications providers – companies such as the BT Group PLC or Virgin Media Inc. – to gather a wealth of information on their customers. Providers would log where emails, tweets, Skype calls and other messages were sent from, who they were sent to, and how large they were. Details of file transfers, phone calls, text messages and instant conversations, such as those carried over BlackBerry Messenger, also would be recorded. The bill also demands that providers collect IP addresses, details of customers’ electronic hardware, and subscriber information including names, addresses and payment information. Even physical communications would be monitored: Address details written on envelopes would be copied; parcel tracking information would be logged as well. All the data would be kept for up to a year or longer if it was the subject of legal proceedings. The measure remains a draft bill, which means it’s subject to change before it is presented to Parliament.