Anxiety Linked to Risk of Stroke

Anxiety Linked to Risk of Stroke:

 

Anxiety Linked to Risk of Stroke

Anxiety Linked to Risk of Stroke

 

 

 

A study is the first to link researchers anxiety and stroke independent of other factors such as depression . Anxiety is one of the most common problems of mental health. Symptoms include worried, stressed , nervous or tense feeling.

A period of 22 years, researchers studied a nationally representative group of 6,019 people aged 25-74 in the first National Health Examination Survey and Nutrition.

Participants underwent an interview and took blood tests, medical examinations and complete psychological questionnaires to measure levels of anxiety and depression . Researchers studied strokes through the reports of the hospital or nursing home , and death certificates. After accounting for other factors , they found that even a modest increase in anxiety were associated with an increased risk of stroke.

People in the highest third anxiety symptoms had a 33 percent higher risk of stroke than those with the lowest levels .

” Everyone has some anxiety from time to time . But when is high and / or chronic, can have an effect on the vasculature years down the road ,” said Maya Lambiase , Ph.D. , study author and cardiovascular medicine behavior researcher at the Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Pittsburgh.

People with high levels of anxiety are more likely to smoke and be physically inactive, possibly explaining part of the link of anxiety – trait . The levels of stress hormones , heart rate or blood pressure could also be factors , Lambiase said.

In previous work , researchers found that depression was associated with an increased risk of stroke , which is the No. 4 murderer and a leading cause of disability in the United States. In contrast to anxiety , depression is a persistent feeling of hopelessness, discouragement and lack of energy, among other symptoms.

New Test Helps Predict Ovarian Cancer

New Test May Help Predict Ovarian Cancer Survival:

 

New Test May Help Predict Ovarian Cancer Survival

New Test May Help Predict Ovarian Cancer Survival

 

A sensitive new DNA test can predict how long ovarian cancer patients will survive, and guide personalized treatment decisions, according to new research.

The technology, called QuanTILfy, counts the number of cells called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a cancer patient’s tumor biopsy. Cancer patients with more of these cells in their tumor tend to have better outcomes, previous studies in ovarian, colorectal and other cancers have shown.

This test is the first that can precisely count the number of immune cells present in a tumor sample.

“We are providing a new tool,” said Jason H. Bielas, a cancer geneticist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, and lead researcher of the study. Unlike currently available tests, which rely on staining tumor tissue and are subject to interpretation, the new test provides a sensitive, numerical readout.

“This is a big step forward to accurately count how many [immune cells] have infiltrated into the tumor,” Bielas said.

In a proof-of-concept study, the researchers tested 30 tumors from ovarian cancer patients who had survived between one month and 10 years with their cancer. [5 Things Women Should Know About Ovarian Cancer]

They found the number of immune cells, as measured by the test, was threefold higher in patients who lived for more than five years after their cancer diagnosis, compared with those who lived less than two years with ovarian cancer. The results are published today (Dec. 4) in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

The test is based on research showing that the strength of a patient’s immune response to their cancer, as well as the effectiveness of the response, varies from patient to patient. The immune response results from TILs recognizing the mutated genes on the surface of cancer cells as “foreign,” zeroing in on these tumor cells and launching an immune reaction to destroy the cancer cells directly.

“The size of the immune response in a tumor has been known for many years to predict survival, and has recently been shown to determine which patients will respond to immunotherapy,” said study researcher Harlan Robins, a computational biologist at Fred Hutchinson.

The QuanTILfy test provides a standardized way to count the immune cells in the tumor, using a digital approach. DNA is extracted from a tissue sample, and then the DNA from the TILs is identified and quantified using a technique called digital polymerase chain reaction.

“This is clearly an outstanding science result that sets the scene for the further development of the test to quantify [immune biomarkers] in different malignancies,” said Dr. Jeffrey Weber, an immunologist and oncologist at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., who was not involved in the study.

Still, the test is not yet ready for use in clinics. First, further validation by other researchers is needed, Weber said.

The older, staining-based tests have not been used to make important treatment decisions for cancer patients because of their high variability, Bielas said. He and his colleagues would like to see if the QuanTILfy test could be used in treatment decisions by including the test in clinical trials of cancer treatments. It’s possible that the test could be used to better predict whether a patient’s cancer is likely to respond to a treatment or combination of treatments.

Particularly, Bielas said he thinks this test could be used to gauge whether a patient is likely to respond to a new class of cancer drugs, called immune therapy drugs, which are still in development but have so far been shown to be effective in some patients.

“Now that we have these immune therapies that work, a test that could indicate whether a patient is more likely to respond to the treatment becomes an important issue” and the ultimate goal of personalized therapy, Weber agreed.

Type 2 diabetes genes and metabolic markers

Type 2 diabetes: New associations identified between genes and metabolic markers:

diabetes-graphic

 

 

 

 

In two comprehensive studies, scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen and Technische Universitaet Muenchen discovered new associations of two major Type 2 diabetes risk genotypes and altered plasma concentrations of metabolic products. The “Virtual Institute Diabetes” joint research cooperation is thereby making an important contribution towards explaining the genetic and molecular basis of diabetes, The results have been published in the journals PLOS ONE and Metabolomics.

For these investigations, participants of the population-based cohort study KORA* carrying high-risk diabetes gene variants without having a diagnosed diabetes, as well as participants without an increased diabetes risk were recruited.

All study participants were subjected to a metabolic load. The nutritients, particularly sugars and fats, were administered either orally or intravenously. The scientists subsequently determined the concentrations of 163 metabolic products in blood samples from the participants. The teams headed by Prof. Dr. Thomas Illig (HMGU) and Dr. Harald Grallert (HMGU), Prof. Dr. Jochen Seißler (LMU), and Prof. Dr. Hans Hauner (TUM) and Dr. Helmut Laumen (TUM) were the first to supply a comprehensive characterisation of the metabolic performance in regard to the respective genotype.

It was observed that the concentrations of the recorded substances represent a particular metabolomic response pattern depending on the genotype. It was possible to verify specific metabolic effects, particularly for the TCF7L2 genotype, which is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. “We are aware of certain high-risk gene variants for type 2 diabetes. However, the causative mechanisms on the path to this disease are still largely unknown. With our results, we are helping to close the gap between disease-associated genes on the one hand and the development of diabetes on the other. A typically changed metabolic performance can supply early indications of diabetes”, explain Simone Wahl from HMGU and Cornelia Then from LMU, first authors of the two publications.

The scientists are currently investigating metabolic responses in additional genotypes. The objective is to advance the fundamental research on the widespread disease diabetes and to contribute the acquired knowledge to the clinical cooperation groups that have developed from the VID in order to promote the knowledge transfer between the laboratory and clinical care of patients suffering from diabetes.