237 Millionaires serving in Congress

There are 237 millionaires serving in Congress , according to 2008 figures:

 

237 Millionaires in Congress

237 Millionaires in Congress

That’s a slight decrease from the previous year , when 239 millionaires in the House and Senate were recorded. But still reflects the fact that the average legislator is much richer than your typical constituent. While about one percent of Americans are millionaires , 44 percent of those serving in Congress they can say the same .

“The biggest takeaway from this is that even thought the collective wealth of members of Congress seem to have diminished , members of Congress are still much richer than the average American – and even richer than many rich Americans, ” spokesman Dave Levinthal told Hotsheet CRP .

Richest member of Congress is Republican Darrell Issa of California congressman, whose net worth is estimated at more than $ 250 million. It is followed by four Democrats : Jane Harman of California ( approx. $ 245 million ) , Herb Kohl of Wisconsin ( approx. $ 215 million ), Mark Warner of Virginia ( approx. U $ S 210 million) and John Kerry of Massachusetts ( approx. $ 209 million).

Among the 25 richest lawmakers – including bold names Nancy Pelosi, Dianne Feinstein and Olympia Snowe – there are 14 Democrats and 11 Republicans , suggesting no clear divisions between wealth party.

The net value calculated for legislators is not exact, and CPR offers a wide range of possible net present values ​​for each member. Levinthal, said lawmakers tend to report assets and liabilities, income, grants and loan transactions , as required by law, in very broad ranges , figure in the list , he said, represents an estimate between two possible extremes. (Primary residences and government salaries are not reported , and therefore not included.)

The less wealthy member of Congress , according to the report, Florida Democrat Alcee Hastings, whose net worth is estimated to be negative $ 4,732,002 . (!) Other legislators to the bottom 25 are Max Baucus of Montana and Dennis Kucinich of Ohio . Note, however, that these legislators are likely to have undeclared assets , including their homes .

In the Executive Branch , Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is the second richest , with a net worth of approximately $ 21 million , which is just behind Exchange Commission Chairman Mary L. Schapiro. The figure is less rich administration Vice President Joe Biden, whose net worth is estimated at only $ 27,012 . ( President Obama comes in at $ 3,670,505 . )

The median reportable net worth of senators was reduced from $ 2,270,000 to $ 1,790,000 robust yet between 2007 and 2008. Kerry , Warner, Feinstein and Senator John McCain all experienced two -digit percentage declines in their average , estimated wealth between the two years .

The median reportable net worth for House members in 2008 was $ 622,254 .

Levinthal points out that ” in some cases [ lawmakers ‘] wealth is derived from the same companies that in many cases benefit from the taxpayers. ”

” The main companies in which members of Congress are investing , many of them are TARP recipients that have received billions and billions of dollars from you and me ,” he said .

Among the companies in which members of Congress have assets are Bank of America and Goldman Sachs.

Congress doesn’t know how NSA works

Congress NSA doesn't works

Congress NSA doesn’t works

While the president and the intelligence community cling to “Congressional oversight” as a justficiation for the pervasive intelligence-gathering programs in place within the US, members of Congress theselves are saying that they don’t have the information they need to exercise real authority over the NSA. A recent report in The Guardian quotes two House members, Morgan Griffith (R-VA) and Alan Grayson (D-FL), who have both requested information about the agency and its programs from the House Intelligence Committee, only to be rebuffed.

In a June 25th request, Rep. Griffith asked the committee for the “classified FISA court order(s)” discussed on Meet the Press the previous weekend — a 2011 opinion holding that many of the NSA’s programs under the FISA Amendments Act were unconstitutitional. Weeks later he requested additional information surrounding Yahoo’s legal challenge to the NSA’s PRISM program and Verizon’s supplying of customer metadata to government intelligence agencies. More than six weeks since the first letter, Griffith still hasn’t received a response.

In Rep. Grayson’s case, the committee did sometimes respond to his requests for information. “The transcript is classified,” read one such reply to a request for the text from a vote — itself a decision to refuse an earlier request for information. So far, neither Griffith nor Grayson have received the information they requested.

Adding to the overall lack of oversight, media reports containing classified information are similarly barred from Congress. Last month, Grayson attempted to circulate slides published by The Guardian only to be told that he could face sanctions because the material they contained was still classified, echoing the Obama administration’s 2010 decision to ban the WikiLeaks website from federal computers while the diplomatic cables it sought to block access to were being published in major newspapers. Expressing frustration at the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Griffith said, “my oath is to make informed decisions, and I can’t do my job when I can’t get even the most basic information about these programs.”

NSA