Nuclear battery developed

 

Long-lasting, water-based nuclear battery developed

Long-lasting, water-based nuclear battery developed

Researchers working at the University of Missouri (MU) claim to have produced a prototype of a nuclear-powered, water-based battery that is said to be both longer-lasting and more efficient than current battery technologies and may eventually be used as a dependable power supply in vehicles, spacecraft, and other applications where longevity, reliability, and efficiency are paramount.

“Betavoltaics, a battery technology that generates power from radiation, has been studied as an energy source since the 1950s,” said associate professor Jae W. Kwon, of the College of Engineering at MU. “Controlled nuclear technologies are not inherently dangerous. We already have many commercial uses of nuclear technologies in our lives including fire detectors in bedrooms and emergency exit signs in buildings.”

Utilizing the radioactive isotope strontium-90 to enhance the electrochemical energy produced in a water-based solution, the researchers have incorporated a nanostructured titanium dioxide electrode acting as a catalyst for water decomposition. That is, the catalyst assists the breakdown of water in conjunction with the applied radiation into assorted oxygen compounds.

As a result, when high-energy beta radiation passes through the platinum and the nanoporous titanium dioxide, electron-hole pairs are produced within the titanium dioxide, creating an electron flow and a resultant electric current.

“Water acts as a buffer and surface plasmons created in the device turned out to be very useful in increasing its efficiency,” Kwon said. “The ionic solution is not easily frozen at very low temperatures and could work in a wide variety of applications including car batteries and, if packaged properly, perhaps spacecraft.”

By no means the first-ever nuclear battery – the NanoTritium device from City Labs being one recent notable example – this is the first nuclear battery that has been produced to exploit the inherent advantages of radiolysis (water-splitting with radiation) to produce an electric current, at higher energy levels and lower temperatures than previously possible. And at much greater claimed efficiencies than other water-splitting energy production techniques.

This is because, unlike other forms of photocatalytic methods of water-splitting to produce energy, the high-energy beta radiation in the MU device produces free radicals in water such that the kinetic energy is recombined or trapped in water molecules so that the radiation can be converted into electricity – using the platinum/titanium dioxide electrode previously described – to achieve water splitting efficiently and at room temperature.

As a result, whilst solar cells use a similar mechanism for the transference of energy via hole-electron pairs, very few free radicals are produced because the photon energies are principally in the visible spectrum and subsequently at lower levels of energy.

Beta radiation produced by the strontium source, on the other hand, with its ability to enhance the chemical reactions involving free radicals at greater electron energy levels, is a much more efficient way to produce extremely long-lasting and reliable energy. So much so, that the water-based nuclear battery may well offer a viable alternative to the solar cell as a sustainable, low-pollution energy source.

 

Source:  Gizmag.com

30 Year Power Laptop Battery

Scientists Invent 30 Year Continuous Power Laptop Battery!

 

Scientists Invent 30 Year Continuous Power Laptop Battery!

Scientists Invent 30 Year Continuous Power Laptop Battery!

 

Your next laptop could have a continuous power battery that lasts for 30 years without a single recharge thanks to work being funded by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory. The breakthrough betavoltaic power cells are constructed from semiconductors and use radioisotopes as the energy source. As the radioactive material decays it emits beta particles that transform into electric power capable of fueling an electrical device like a laptop for years.

Although betavoltaic batteries sound Nuclear they’re not, they’re neither use fission/fusion or chemical processes to produce energy and so (do not produce any radioactive or hazardous waste). Betavoltaics generate power when an electron strikes a particular interface between two layers of material. The Process uses beta electron emissions that occur when a neutron decays into a proton which causes a forward bias in the semiconductor. This makes the betavoltaic cell a forward bias diode of sorts, similar in some respects to a photovoltaic (solar) cell. Electrons scatter out of their normal orbits in the semiconductor and into the circuit creating a usable electric current.

The profile of the batteries can be quite small and thin, a porous silicon material is used to collect the hydrogen isotope tritium which is generated in the process. The reaction is non-thermal which means laptops and other small devices like mobile phones will run much cooler than with traditional lithium-ion power batteries. The reason the battery lasts so long is that neutron beta-decay into protons is the world’s most concentrated source of electricity, truly demonstrating Einstein’s theory E=MC2.

The best part about these cells are when they eventually run out of power they are totally inert and non-toxic, so environmentalists need not fear these high tech scientific wonder batteries. If all goes well plans are for these cells to reach store shelves in about 2 to 3 years.

 

Source:  bink.nu

Apple’s iPhone 5 battery Sucks

IPhone 5 battery issues reported, poor battery life remains Smartphones’ dirty little secret:

 iPhone 5 battery issues reported Seems poor battery life remains smartphones’ dirty little secret.


iPhone 5 battery issues reported
Seems poor battery life remains smartphones’ dirty little secret.

Apple’s claims to have improved the smartphone owner’s perennial problem of disappointing battery life with the iPhone 5 look to be wide of the mark today, amid an outbreak of complaints from chagrined early adopters. With no official response and mixed testimonies online, it’s hard to discern the scale of the problem. However, threads on the Apple support forums, one of which stretches to over 100 replies, more than testify to its existence.

iPhone 5 black bottom half close-up

Among them is Holdrege, who reports that his “iPhone 5 drains way faster than my two-year-old iPhone 4. Meanwhile, DJleviathan attests that although Apple claims the battery will provide “eight hours of constant use” in reality it “ends up only lasting half that time”. One London-based Orange customer who got in touch with us reported that his battery fell from “90 per cent to 10 per cent in eight hours with LTE on”, in which time he claims to have only used the internet to “check the Fulham scores once or twice”. Apple’s marketing copy claims that the iPhone 5’s custom-built A6 processor is so power efficient that the phone lasts twice as long as the iPhone 4S on a single full charge, despite potential battery-punishing features on the new handset such as a larger screen and 4G connectivity. The company is also currently attempting to deflect criticism of the iPhone 5’s Apple Maps mapping solution, which has been found to be riddled with inaccuracies and spelling howlers.

 

0.3mm Organic Battery

NEC develops 0.3mm thick organic battery:

Organic Battery

Organic Battery

Organic batteries are an exciting area of research at the moment due to the benefits and potential they have to power our gadgets in the future. One of the companies at the forefront of organic battery development is NEC, which has been working on these polymer-based batteries since 2001 and had its first major release in 2005.  Organic batteries are desirable because they have a very high energy density considering their size, use no heavy metals, and are incredibly thin. That last feature is highlighted by NEC’s latest breakthrough, which has seen the creation of a 0.3mm thick organic radical battery.  Such a thin battery can be placed inside objects that are already very limited in thickness, for example, a sheet of e-paper, and of course a smart card or credit card. Until now the thickness was limited to 0.7mm, but NEC managed to cut that by over 50% all thanks to printed components.  The prototype battery was created by printing an integrated circuit and battery directly on to a polymer film. Such components allowed for a complete system to be built including a display, antenna, and encryption system. All of which sounds like the perfect solution for next-generation smart cards.  As for the power on offer from this super-thin battery, output is rated as 5kW/L with a capacity of 3mAh. In real terms that means the integrated display can be refreshed 2,000x, or the antenna can be used to transmit data 35x before a recharge is required. The recharge only takes around 30 seconds to top up the battery fully, and the capacity is only reduced by 25% after 500 charges.